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Call for Cantieroteca!

News — January 7, 2013

One year after its opening, the Cantieroteca – the research archive created and curated by us in collaboration with Careof DOCVA – is again collecting publications.

We are looking for critical writings, personal research and editorial projects (also self-published), which deal with design and visual communication from a critical point of view and with a particular focus on their role in society.

All the texts in the archive are free for consultation and open to everybody. We support free sharing of knowledge and self- directed learning in the fields of design and visual communication.

All the works will be collected, catalogued and made available for consultation at the gallery space of Careof DOCVA – La Fabbrica del Vapore, via Procaccini 4, Milan

We invite everybody who wants to visit the Cantieroteca and/or who wants to make a contribution to the growth of its holdings to contact us by mail:
pratichenonaffermative@gmail.com
As well as an archive based in Milan, the Cantieroteca is a moving library which travels through Italy hosted by publishing fairs, libraries and schools. To keep updated on the next events and follow Cantieroteca’s movements visit our website:
pratichenonaffermative.wordpress.com/en/cantieroteca/

We wish for the Cantieroteca project to inspire and stimulate the making of independent publications in the fields of design and visual communication, and to promote and support the many examples that already exist but that, unfortunately, are little known.

In Italy is very difficult to find books and independent publishing projects that talk about visual culture from a critical point of view. The only way to look at this kind of publications is almost always having a quick look during fairs, buying them online, or through niche circuits.

Graphic design could and should be an intellectual instrument to look deep into society, to spread ideas and political, social and economical issues.
From the “Call for Criticism” platform, a project by Caterina Giuliani.

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